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May 31st with 27,932 notes - Reblog

(Source: coralreefie)

May 31st with 4,736 notes - Reblog

(Source: amajor7)

May 31st with 193,395 notes - Reblog

asexual-not-a-sexual:

Things the UCSB shooting should prompt discussion about:

  1. Violence against women
  2. A man’s sense of obligation to the bodies of women
  3. Rape culture
  4. Violence against women
  5. How masculinity is connected to lose of virginity
  6. Violence against women
  7. Gun control 
  8. Violence against women 
  9. How women are called “sluts” for having sex but then literally murdered for not having sex
  10. Violence against women
  11. Violence against women 
  12. Violence against women
May 25th with 17,898 notes - Reblog

spencer1901:

Paris || March, 2014
(views from the Eiffel Tower)

May 23rd with 19,184 notes - Reblog

David Bowie and ImanMr. and Mrs. Jones

They met on October 1990 on a blind date set up by a mutual friend, Teddy Antolin, who was also their hairdresser.

Bowie fell in love with her at first sight.

“I was naming the children the night we met … it was absolutely immediate.” However, Iman was reluctant to a date a rock star. In an interview she shared, “I did not want to get involved with a rock star. No way. It is not a sane thing to do, but David changed my mind. He wooed me.” 

"I remember once we went out to dinner and the laces on my trainers came undone, and David was down on his knees in the middle of the street, tying them for me. I thought to myself, ‘This one’s a keeper.’"

“His actions spoke louder [than words],” she said. “We were dating for two weeks and I was coming from Paris and I got to L.A. at the airport and the doors open to the plane and I come out and I see all these people taking a picture of somebody. And he was standing there, flowers in hand, no security. That was when I knew he was a keeper. He didn’t care if anyone saw.”

They have been together ever since.

“My marriage is exactly as fabulous as you all would think.” She grinned.

”We have dates, you know - we’ll go to a museum, then we’ll have a long lunch. That’s what’s interesting, that’s what’s exciting.”

”First, you fancy each other - that doesn’t go. It might take different forms, but he’s good company. He’s funny, he’s engaging, he’s whip-smart, he’s interested in diverse things. It keeps on evolving - it doesn’t stay sedentary.”

He still ties her shoelaces at times, and still buys Iman her favourite flowers on the 14th of every month: the anniversary of the day they met.

As for their relationship at home: “David doesn’t fight, He is English, so he just stays quiet. I’m the screamer. Then he always makes me laugh. It’s like cabaret. I keep him entertained too.”

"I still fancy him, totally, after all these years."

“He has managed, somehow I don’t know, miraculously, to have my heart flutter when he walks into the room still. So, yes he’s definitely the one, he’s definitely my one.”

"‘I am not married to David Bowie — I am married to David Jones. They are two totally different people.’

"It was so lucky that we were to meet at that time in our lives, when we were both yearning for each other," says Bowie. "She is an incredibly beautiful woman, but that’s just one thing. It’s what’s in there that counts."

What’s “in there”, Iman confesses, is “the wonderful realisation that I have found my soul mate, with whom sexual compatibility is just the tip of the iceberg. We have so much in common, and are totally alike in a lot of things”. It’s not a love of music, or fashion, or the fact that “like David has his feminine side, I have a masculine side”, she insists, but the more old-fashioned values: romance, family, commitment.

Bowie on their relationship says, ”I don’t have that sense of loneliness that I had before, which was very, very strong. It became a subtext for a lot of things I wrote.”

"We work hard at keeping the relationship alive. We talk to each other continuously. We have complete and absolute faith in each other."

(Source: charlesdances)

May 22nd with 19,671 notes - Reblog

Huntington Gardens, 2 / The Blue Hour, 2013Brian Ferry

Huntington Gardens, 2 / The Blue Hour, 2013
Brian Ferry

(Source: plizm)

May 22nd with 6,083 notes - Reblog
There’s a new stereotype of Asian women that I’m troubled by. It’s the image of the Asian female competition seen on these shows - Glee, Community and New Girl.
Exhibit A: Sunshine Corazon (played by Charice) on Glee Sunshine comes to the McKinley High and proves to be a worthy replacement for some of Rachel’s solos. Rachel retaliates by sending Sunshine to some abandoned, sketchy house for a fake audition. I don’t really remember what the deal with her was, but basically, Rachel took her down.
Exhibit B: Annie Kim on Community Annie Kim is Annie’s high GPA/overachieving nemesis in their Poli Sci class and is a threat in their model UN. White Annie’s team beats Annie Kim’s after White Annie’s team suggests a union of their UN’s, gets rejected by Kim and Kim is painted as the ruthless competitor who only wants to win.
Exhibit C: Asian Jess on New Girl After Jess backslides and hooks up with her ex Paul, the experience makes him realize that his current girlfriend, “Asian Jess,” is the one for him, and Jess helps him propose to her. Both Asian Jess and Paul are also ugly criers. Clearly made for each other.
So, the first thing I will say is that all these Asian women look pretty much the same…big, plastic frames, “cute hair” (a.k.a. infantilized) with bangs and pigtails…and a not so happy white, female rival. They all have short/minor roles, and at least with Annie Kim and Asian Jess don’t have an identity of their own. The writers have clearly written them to rival their white counterparts. They don’t even get their own names.
The white women characters are threatened by these Asian women, not so much with Asian Jess, but she has taken something that was once Jess’.
These representations depict Asians as threats to the success of white women or just a joke, not real characters. None of these 3 women could have stood on their own in a scene, and were not given an opportunity to turn into someone to empathize with. Maybe Sunshine Corazon…but anyways, this is a harmful representation, especially given China’s crazy economic growth in the past couple decades, and the possibility of becoming the next superpower of the world. Couple that with the model minority myth, and how Asians are stereotyped to be smart, good at math, taking up all the spots in elite universities, these characters are a way of saying, “You can try to beat me, but I’ll still find a way to win.” After all, Jess takes the higher ground of putting Paul and Asian Jess together, because clearly she is so mature, and Annie proposes a compromise; what a team player!
I also feel like there may be an element of white fear of Asian women taking all the white men (i.e. Barney Stinson says in one episode of How I Met Your Mother that his type is “Asian”). All these representations can be seen as a fear of the loss of power of the U.S. empire and white women’s sexuality being threatened.
In conjunction to this, many Asian men in tv and movies are emasculated and are turned into awkward characters easily turned into comic relief (i.e. Ken Jeong in Community). Again, characters are not complete people, lacking the depth that makes a really compelling character. Yes, you can argue that Christina Yang’s character on Grey’s is a strong, empowering figure, but she could easily be white. Her character isn’t race-specific, and she’s within a whole class of competitive, cut-throat doctors.
This post could delve deeper into the implications of these representations, but for now, I’ll keep it simple, and maybe analyze more later. For another post, it’ll be interesting to factor in the rise Asians in commercials, to explore the disconnect/exploitation of Asians as a good economic demographic to market to, but aren’t represented in popular culture in the same way.

Everyday I’m hustlin’: The Asian Competition  (via cindymayweather)

This is overwhelmingly accurate and shitty.

Personal anecdote on the subject of Asian Annie/Jess: there is another (white) Lauren on my improv team and when I joined certain white people thought it would be a great idea to exclusively refer to me as “Asian Lauren” to tell us apart. Not my last name or initial, not a new nickname entirely. They immediately went for the racial identifier. I shut that shit down quickly because referring to me as “Asian Lauren” framed my friend Lauren (who is actually wonderful and did not participate in or condone this) as the default and me as the “other” and created a competitive relationship where there shouldn’t have been one. I don’t see why I had to be “The Other Lauren” when I am just another Lauren. It’s frustrating and telling that white folks were so quick to other me and place us in unnecessary competition with each other over something as trivial and common as sharing a first name. This could so easily have been a non issue, but of course ignorant white folks were so quick to turn it into something racially isolating for me.

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- May 19th with 3,489 notes - Reblog
pleatedjeans:

via

pleatedjeans:

via

May 11th with 156,944 notes - Reblog

Creedence Clearwater Revival eating at a Taco Bell in 1968 (in SLO, CA)

Creedence Clearwater Revival eating at a Taco Bell in 1968 (in SLO, CA)

(Source: dbeatdylan)

May 9th with 7,399 notes - Reblog