For as long as there’s been a mainstream feminist movement, there have been corporations eager to capitalize on women’s desire for empowerment. And simply saying men and women should be treated equally isn’t the slightest bit risky in an era when the economy demands that nearly all women work outside the home and the biggest pop stars in America embrace the term feminist. But empowerment conferences are less a product of this friendly brand of modern feminism than they are the result of changing media business models and the rise of superficial corporate do-gooderism. Consumers are so wary of traditional advertising that one of the only ways for brands to make an end-run around skepticism is to claim, “Hey, we’re doing some good here.” As Unilever has learned with all the free press its “body-positive” Dove ads have gotten, women’s empowerment is a great theme for conscientious advertising — Bitch Magazine co-founder Andi Zeisler calls it “empowertising.” You-go-girl ads appeal to a broad demographic, but unlike championing, say, stricter environmental regulation, they put the onus for change on women themselves, not corporations or society.
What Good Is a ‘Powerful Women’ Conference? - NYmag.com (via annfriedman) - October 16th with 678 notes - Reblog
What Do You Really Mean When You Say ‘Basic Bitch’?→

"Basic-tagging is coolly lazy. It conveys a graduate seminar’s worth of semiotics in five letters […] But why? It seems to me that while what it pretends to criticize is unoriginality of thought and action, most of what basic actually seeks to dismiss is consumption patterns — what you watch, what you drink, what you wear, and what you buy — without dismissing consumption itself.”

October 14th with 24 notes - Reblog

nevver:

Army men yoga

October 5th with 17,033 notes - Reblog
No book generated more passion among its readers than A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, a gritty coming-of-age novel. On a Pacific island, a lucky soldier given a new copy “howled with joy,” but knew he’d have to sleep on top of it if he hoped to hang onto it long enough to finish it. A 20-year-old Marine “went through hell” in two years of combat, but wrote from his stateside hospital bed that the book had made him feel human again. It might, he conceded, be “unusual for a supposedly battle-hardened marine to do such an effeminate thing as weep over a piece of fiction,” but he was now making his way through the book for the third time. In France, the colonel commanding an anti-aircraft battalion being shelled by German artillery found one of his soldiers reading the book between explosions. “He started to read us a portion … and we laughed like hell between bursts. It sure was funny.” The tough West Pointer later found a copy of his own, and was tempted to pull it out and read it while wounded and pinned down by enemy fire. “It was that interesting,” he recalled, in a letter to the publisher.

no you’re fucking crying (x)

JANET!!

(via stealsmokedfish)

(Source: isabelthespy)

- October 5th with 106 notes - Reblog
fascist:

Sartre and his cat called Nothing.

fascist:

Sartre and his cat called Nothing.

(Source: lugubriousgame)

September 23rd with 2,799 notes - Reblog

September 23rd with 56 notes - Reblog
freundevonfreunden:

Zizek Meets Abercrombie & Fitch
The New Yorker has rediscovered a 2003 Abercrombie & Fitch catalogue which reveals that the editorial team invited contemporary critical theorist Slavoj Zizek to comment on the photos they had prepared. 
Read the full story here. 

freundevonfreunden:

Zizek Meets Abercrombie & Fitch

The New Yorker has rediscovered a 2003 Abercrombie & Fitch catalogue which reveals that the editorial team invited contemporary critical theorist Slavoj Zizek to comment on the photos they had prepared. 

Read the full story here

September 22nd with 2,317 notes - Reblog
euo:

Jenny Holzer.

euo:

Jenny Holzer.

September 22nd with 2,625 notes - Reblog

dogmobile:

Fall 2014 fashion: Scout’s ham costume from To Kill A Mockingbird

image

August 27th with 87,677 notes - Reblog
He lit a cigarette. His glass of whiskey lit a cigarette. “I can only truly love my dead best friend,” he said, “but not in a gay way. Women wouldn’t understand. They’re too gay.” Both of the cigarettes agreed.
from Mallory Ortberg’s hilarious “Male Novelist Jokes.” (via coketalk) - August 27th with 11,205 notes - Reblog